Grammar/spelling/language police

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Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby southbrishammer on Fri May 19, 2017 11:11 pm

I'm not the kind of person who gets annoyed by bad grammar, spelling or use of the English language; instead I quite enjoy it, probably because it makes me feel superior. Misplaced apostrophes and words that sound the same but are spelled differently (there/their/they're) are the most common examples, but does anyone have any better examples?

This thread is inspired by a headline on the BBC website today (I always thought the BBC were the guardians of the Queen's English, so should know better): "If young people voted bigly, would it change everything?". As I understand it, "bigly" is an Old English word meaning "with great force" or "violently" which came back into public consciousness when Donald Trump used it incorrectly in a debate last year. So why are the BBC using it incorrectly in a headline on their website? And what meaning are they trying to convey in their headline?
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby Big George on Fri May 19, 2017 11:38 pm

southbrishammer wrote:I'm not the kind of person who gets annoyed by bad grammar, spelling or use of the English language; instead I quite enjoy it, probably because it makes me feel superior. Misplaced apostrophes and words that sound the same but are spelled differently (there/their/they're) are the most common examples, but does anyone have any better examples?

This thread is inspired by a headline on the BBC website today (I always thought the BBC were the guardians of the Queen's English, so should know better): "If young people voted bigly, would it change everything?". As I understand it, "bigly" is an Old English word meaning "with great force" or "violently" which came back into public consciousness when Donald Trump used it incorrectly in a debate last year. So why are the BBC using it incorrectly in a headline on their website? And what meaning are they trying to convey in their headline?


Can you provide a link? Bigly obviously related to Trump
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby vietnammer on Fri May 19, 2017 11:41 pm

There's nothing wrong with continuing changes in a language, it's a sign that it's alive. 'Bigly' does jar a bit from the BBC, but I had no idea that it had an older usage (thanks SBH) and I guess it gives it credibility because the context in which it was used (voting enthusiastically in numbers) doesn't seem very different. Words like 'fantastic' and 'incredible' used to be negative i.e. that which is not to be believed but they have become superlatives in a positive way.

The 'could of/should of' misinterpretation of the weak spoken form of 'have' in the present perfect annoys me, and I hear it on the BBC as well (don't even start about this website!) , but you might as well accept that time moves on and language is, essentially, liquid. Americans are at this very moment trying to kill perfect tenses for good.

Then there's the aspect of register and context. If someone is talking live on radio I can forgive them making unplanned grammatical errors and resorting to 'modern' idioms. I heard a BBC announcer correct himself yesterday on a fairly complex clause vs emphasis issue so fair play to him, but we really shouldn't be pernickity imo. I like the way the commentators use grammatical English while the ex-player pundit talks 'terrace'.

Won't write a book on it, but Viz magazine used to be very smart at picking up on popular 'lazy' English usage and ignorant spelling (**** of Man Utd ****). This is a feature of every language and only increases with universal literacy. It's better than when no-one could read or write innit.

PS: The West Indian Dread is a favourite. They still (due to a phenomenon linguists call 'peripheral fossilisation'') use it in the sense of 'to be respected' which was current in Elizabethan/Jacobean times whereas we now use it to mean 'to be feared'.

Up the ammers.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby southbrishammer on Sat May 20, 2017 1:21 am

Big George wrote:Can you provide a link? Bigly obviously related to Trump

This gives both the context in which Trump used the word, and the historic usage of the word. Assuming it's correct (this is the internet, after all), it makes very interesting reading for saddoes like me.
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/dictionary-expert-bigly-is-actually-933072
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby southbrishammer on Sat May 20, 2017 1:24 am

And here's the link to the BBC usage: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2017-39965925
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby Monkeybubbles on Sat May 20, 2017 7:24 am

Turgid.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby nickkarkie on Sat May 20, 2017 9:15 am

I've tried to get Fmgod to use HE'S but he keeps putting HIS :)

His a great player.

The ones that annoy me the most are:

His/He's
Brought/Bought
Superlatives, More Bigger/Most Biggest/Bestest
Your/You're. How many posts do you see on Facebook videos saying "Your an Idiot!"?

Surely you learn all of the above when you are 6 years old.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby 'stone hammer on Sat May 20, 2017 9:55 am

nickkarkie wrote:I've tried to get Fmgod to use HE'S but he keeps putting HIS :)

His a great player.

.


I feel like we've all tried that. I swear he uses it that often that he's doing it on purpose
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby nickkarkie on Sat May 20, 2017 10:07 am

I think you are right, because I saw this morning that he put "He is" at the start of a second sentence when he had used "His" in the first sentence.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby last.caress on Sat May 20, 2017 10:09 am

Should of.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby vietnammer on Sat May 20, 2017 10:10 am

Fed up of
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby Hammer1972 on Sat May 20, 2017 10:46 am

I could care less about any of this stuff.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby The Old Man of Storr on Sat May 20, 2017 10:49 am

Going off on a slight tangent to our subject -

I grew up speaking Welsh [ I honestly can't remember when English was introduced , it would have been before Primary School age ] and as my group of friends grew to include English only speakers I did notice that we Welsh speakers would be constantly dotting our speech with a few English words - It's worse for me now as I do not use Welsh on a daily basis as I did when I lived on Anglesey . Nowadays it seems to have become the norm that when a Welsh word doesn't come to mind the English variety is substituted , it's a kind of mixture of the two languages - it works of course , but the Welsh language is being constantly diluted as a result . It's got to the point whereby the Welsh place-name for some areas of Wales has actually been changed to English [ the recent ' Happy Donkey Hill ' story in the news comes to mind ] , as children my Mum and Dad would take my sister and I to a lovely little beach called ' Porth Trescastell ' - it's now been changed to ' Cable Bay ' on the Ordnance Survey map .

Now it's the English language which is being changed or diluted by Americanism such as using ' of ' instead of ' have ' - we are writing phonetically at times - we can either look upon language as being fluid and constantly changing or we can point out the mistakes .
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby RichieRiv on Sat May 20, 2017 10:54 am

I think auto complete has a lot to answer for. I read some of my posts, especially those written on my phone and am appalled at my grammar.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby last.caress on Sat May 20, 2017 11:03 am

vietnammer wrote:Fed up of


Tbh, I don't really see grammar nazis about all that much, any more. You still get them on Twitter and in The Guardian's comments sections, but most forums these days (including this one of course) don't take kindly at all to their patrons being pulled up on their grammar, providing said patrons are basically making themselves understood. Rightly so, too.

More concerning to me directly is my b*stard keyboard's numerous autocorrect obsessions, including capitalising words seemingly at random, changing "of" to "if" every ****ing time and mindbendingly changing "the" to "gherkin" whenever the mood takes it. The missus laughs and tells me to "Stop screaming at it and just change the autocorrect settings, you pillock" but I don't know how. :oops:

But "should of/would of/could of" is one I see everywhere, all the time, to such a degree that the language is probably just going to change to accept it rather than ever see it corrected now, I suppose. (case in point re. my bloody autocorrect: In typing out the word "corrected" just then, I mistakenly hit the "i" key instead of the "o" key to spell out "cirrected". Did it sort it out for me, though? No, it changed the entire word to "vibrated" instead. Load of auld bumwank)

Hammer1972 wrote:I could care less about any of this stuff.


This one is a particular bugbear of the wife's, along with "My bad". Must be something about the Americanisation of the terms, or something. I mean she's never pulled anyone on it - she'd never do that - but, whenever someone says "could care less" or "my bad" on the telly I can hear her eyes rolling in her head.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby PF. on Sat May 20, 2017 11:14 am

RichieRiv wrote:I think auto complete has a lot to answer for. I read some of my posts, especially those written on my phone and am appalled at my grammar.


Is the concrete arseholess
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby nickkarkie on Sat May 20, 2017 11:54 am

Hammer1972 wrote:I could care less about any of this stuff.

Completely agree, could care less means that there is still room to care less, hence the opposite of what they are trying to say.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby vietnammer on Sat May 20, 2017 11:58 am

Ere look listen nah nah listen right nah listen. Didjer know that the real name for 'orange' is 'naranj'?. Wots appened is that we've grammarnazi'd it into beginning with a vowel to satisfy the urge to use 'an' istead of 'a'.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby Devils Advocate on Sat May 20, 2017 12:04 pm

Using "loose" instead of "lose"

Particularly annoying in seasons like the one we've just had.
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Re: Grammar/spelling/language police

Postby fmgod on Sat May 20, 2017 12:44 pm

nickkarkie wrote:I've tried to get Fmgod to use HE'S but he keeps putting HIS :)

His a great player.

The ones that annoy me the most are:

His/He's
Brought/Bought
Superlatives, More Bigger/Most Biggest/Bestest
Your/You're. How many posts do you see on Facebook videos saying "Your an Idiot!"?

Surely you learn all of the above when you are 6 years old.


I'm sure I'm slightly dyslexic to fair, got A Level English A star so I'm not thick, just when I type quickly I just seem to muddle words up or do other bizarre things, I can literally be thinking " the man went to the shops" and write it as "the went man to the shops"
Last edited by fmgod on Sat May 20, 2017 12:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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