Change of career

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Re: Change of career

Postby Coops on Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:50 pm

I have changed careers a few times. Once because what I was doing wasn't earning enough and I had a good opportunity, the other 2 because I was suddenly out of work. The last time was the worst as I really didn't know what I was doing, I spent a year scratching around, doing van driving jobs, boot sales, anything I could.
I started my business as a way to earn a bit extra and now 7 years later I an happier than ever.

Life is short, you need to follow your heart and not worry about the consequences.
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Re: Change of career

Postby Yea Why Not on Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:05 am

I studied and worked in IT until the age of 27 in London. I now live in Australia operating heavy machinery on building sites. Much prefer it and earn way more money

Now there's a career change :D
Last edited by Yea Why Not on Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Change of career

Postby EastBrisHammer on Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:00 am

I came to the conclusion years ago that there is nothing I want to do five days a week, 8 hours a day. Even my hobbies, which I have plenty of, I wouldn't want to do every day. So I am happy pootling along doing what I am doing now and hopefully go down to a 4 day week in a few years time.

So if you are dissatisfied in a job ask yourself will you be happy in any job. What can you do to make the experience more bearable and not impact on yourself.
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Re: Change of career

Postby DaveWHU1964 on Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:48 pm

EastBrisHammer wrote:I came to the conclusion years ago that there is nothing I want to do five days a week, 8 hours a day. Even my hobbies, which I have plenty of, I wouldn't want to do every day. So I am happy pootling along doing what I am doing now and hopefully go down to a 4 day week in a few years time.

So if you are dissatisfied in a job ask yourself will you be happy in any job. What can you do to make the experience more bearable and not impact on yourself.


You could also ask what job would you be happy doing.

When I left the job I'd done 9-5, Monday to Friday for thirty years I decided I really didn't want to do that sort of gig for another 12-17 years. Apart from anything else I couldn't see me lasting the course.

Since I eventually took redundancy I've done it the other way to how you see you doing it. Started off doing about three- four working days a month because I just didn't have the work to start with. Built and now I'm averaging four days a week which is the maximum I want to do - apart from anything else I still end up doing company / client related stuff on some of the other three days. But the key thing is that all the freelance work I do is stuff I like doing so I don't get bored or in a rut.

I tried to say to Wiz earlier - identify not just what you're good at at work but also what you actually like doing. That combination hopefully should see most through.
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Re: Change of career

Postby The Old Man of Storr on Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:28 am

At the age of 10 I told my Mam that when I grew up I wanted to become a Vicar as they only worked on Sundays . Don't need no Life Coach .
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Re: Change of career

Postby Hummer_I_mean_Hammer on Fri Nov 10, 2017 1:32 am

Bit late, but thanks for all the advice.
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Re: Change of career

Postby The Sherriff on Fri Nov 10, 2017 1:45 pm

If you haven’t got kids then now is the right time to certainly consider change.

I’ve always thought a rich man is one that genuinely loves what they do for a living.

A simple rule I try to live by is that on a Sunday, I’m not dreading work the next day, When I am, I know change is required.

I never dreamed of IT/Telecoms when I was a kid, alas it’s the only thing I can do to earn money.

I harbour dreams of getting books published or owning a restaurant/bar. Maybe one it we’ll happen …..
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Re: Change of career

Postby The Old Man of Storr on Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:05 pm

I've had a couple of jobs I dreaded going to but I had 2 kids and a wife to support and bit the bullet - the decision you have to make is whether the money and the perks that go with the job is worth the grief you're going through - what does your wife have to say on the matter , is she supportive of you like a good wife should be - if you're capable of finding another job on similar money in a similar position then go for it , you have nothing to lose .

I started off with Barclays Bank , had 4 years of it before jacking it in - I always fancied owning a cottage by a river or the sea with a few acres of land , I achieved that little dream but I still had to work somewhere - I'm probably the wrong person to talk to because I always put quality of life before any job .

Good Luck .
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Re: Change of career

Postby RichieRiv on Fri Nov 10, 2017 7:15 pm

I think a lot of this is not down to the job but in fact your personality type. Some people are never satisfied with their lot -myself included. I know that I could have my dream job and I would still find something that frustrates me. Others (generally the optimistic type) are able to minimise the frustraions and focus purely on the good bits.

I also think there's a lot of truth in what OMOS says. If you are a provider then odds are you're more risk averse to either a career change or even a change in jobs.
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Re: Change of career

Postby hammer1975 on Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:56 pm

Some really good responses so far but for what it's worth:

I think the main value of a mentor or a life coach or anyone that you can talk to about it is hearing yourself out loud organising your own thoughts. That can be incredibly valuable - asking prompting questions for you to answer as it has to be your own decision. For example - do you know what elements of your job that you are keen to get away from, are there bits you do like? There are bits of jobs that are transferable - do you like managing people or would you prefer not to. Do you want to be office based or getting out and about. I completed my own pros/cons analysis when deciding whether to move roles previously. The actual process helped steer me - I ended up staying in the same organisation after explaining the reasons that I was going to leave, ended up being given an opportunity that was a much more fitting role for me.

Everyone's situation is different - wife, 3 kids, mortgage for me so limits options a bit. But I have a friend who's mantra is 'you'll regret the things you don't do in life more than the things that you do do' - she quit a high profile, well paid, professional career to take a low paid career working with dogs ..... and is the happiest I've ever seen her (despite struggling financially at times).

Good luck for whatever way you go Wizzo :thup:
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